Targeted Therapy Proves Effective Against Aggressive Blood Cancer in Clinical Trial
April 2019  |  Science News
A multi-institutional clinical trial has given good results for a targeted therapy to treat a rare, aggressive blood cancer known as blastic plasmacytoid dendritic-cell neoplasm (BPDCN). Details on the trial, which supported Food and Drug Administration approval of the tagraxofusp therapy.
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Gene Circuits Wired into Cells Elicit Switch-Like Behavioral Output
April 2019  |  Science News
Researchers plan to use the analog-to-digital converter and other synthetic gene circuits to explore and manipulate the regulatory programs that guide immune and stem cell functions with an eye on developing transformational cell-based therapeutics from engineered human cells.
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Diabetes drug may reverse heart failure
April 2019  |  Science News
Researchers have demonstrated that the recently developed antidiabetic drug empagliflozin can treat and reverse the progression of heart failure in non-diabetic animal models. Their study also shows that this drug can make the heart produce more energy and function more efficiently.
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Gene therapy restores immunity in infants with rare immunodeficiency disease
April 2019  |  Science News
A small clinical trial has shown that gene therapy can safely correct the immune systems of infants newly diagnosed with a rare, life-threatening inherited disorder in which infection-fighting immune cells do not develop or function normally.
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Combining CRISPR With Drug Discovery to Understand Treatment Efficacy
April 2019  |  Science News
Recently, drug developers designed a new attack, one intended to target the patient's malfunctioning genes, reclaim their hijacked cells, and halt growth.
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First 3D Engineered Vascularized Human Heart Is Bioprinted
April 2019  |  Science News
Scientists have printed the world’s first 3D vascularized engineered heart using a patient’s own cells and biological materials. Generation of thick vascularized tissues that fully match the patient still remains an unmet challenge in cardiac tissue engineering. Here, a simple approach to 3D-print thick, vascularized, and perfusable cardiac patches that completely match the immunological, cellular, biochemical, and anatomical properties of the patient is reported.
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'Fingerprint database' could help scientists to identify new cancer culprits
April 2019  |  Science News
Scientists have developed a catalogue of DNA mutation 'fingerprints' that could help doctors pinpoint the environmental culprit responsible for a patient's tumor - including showing some of the fingerprints left in lung tumors by specific chemicals found in tobacco smoke.
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Scientists design new cell model of aging-associated colon cancer risk
April 2019  |  Science News
Researchers say a new study of clusters of mouse cells known as "organoids" has significantly strengthened evidence that epigenetic changes, common to aging, play a essential role in colon cancer initiation. The findings show that epigenetic changes are the spark that pushes colon-cancer driving gene mutations into action.
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In mice, eliminating damaged mitochondria alleviates chronic inflammatory disease
April 2019  |  Science News
Treatment with a choline kinase inhibitor prompts immune cells to clear away damaged mitochondria, thus reducing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and preventing inflammation.
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Famous p53 Gene Also Protects Against Birth Defects
April 2019  |  Science News
New research has revealed how the famous tumour suppressor gene p53 is surprisingly critical for development of the neural tube in female embryos.The neural tube is needed for the brain and the spinal cord to form properly. Scientists explained p53’s involvement in a molecular process specific to females called ‘X chromosome inactivation’. The new findings helped to clarify why females are significantly more likely than males to be born with neural tube birth defects, such as spina bifida.
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